Data


Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 


Cardiovascular Health

The Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health Branch monitors efforts to prevent and control hypertension and high blood cholesterol, primary risk factors for heart disease and stroke, in North Carolina. In 2018, high blood pressure was the primary cause of 637 deaths and contributed to 24,326 heart disease and stroke deaths in North Carolina. About 2.8 million North Carolina adults (35%) have been diagnosed with high blood pressure by a health care professional.

Blood Pressure

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Diabetes Control and Prevention

The Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health Branch monitors efforts to prevent, manage and increase awareness of diabetes in North Carolina. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in North Carolina. In 2018, diabetes was the primary cause for 3,021deaths (3% of all deaths) and a contributed to many more deaths in North Carolina. Over 1.5million North Carolinians may have prediabetes but are unaware of their condition. Without lifestyle changes to improve their health, 15% to 30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years.

glucose monitor

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Obesity

The Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health Branch monitors efforts to decrease rates of overweight and obesity among children, youth and adults in North Carolina. An estimated 5.5 million North Carolina adults (68%) are either overweight or obese. North Carolina has the 23rd highest prevalence of overweight and the 20th highest prevalence of obesity among the 50 states and Washington, D.C. North Carolina has the 27th highest overweight and obesity rates among children age 10 to 17 in the nation.

Scale

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Physical Activity and Nutrition

The Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health Branch monitors efforts to increase physical activity and healthy eating in childcare facilities, worksites, communities and among North Carolinians at large. In 2017, about 37% of North Carolina adults ate fruits less than one time per day and about 16% ate vegetables less than one time per day compared to 37% and 18% nationally. Adults need 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week and should perform muscle-strengthening activities at least two days per week. In 2017 about 49% of North Carolina adults engaged in 150 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity per week compared to about 51% of adults nationally.

grapes

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